GAMERA Rolls Onto DVD This May

Gamera-poster

Finally, the classic GAMERA is coming to DVD!

Shout! Factory has officially announced the Rubber Turtle's 1965 classic and we couldn't be happier.

For anyone that thinks men running around in huge rubber suits battling villains in equally bad costumes fighting amidst modeled cars and buildings sounds like a good time - i.e., us - this cult classic will find an immediate home on the DVD shelf. While the big turtle is probably best known for being Godzilla's main competition, this swirling ball of fury battles villains while also having a very unique telepathic connection with a young boy.

If you're a fan of the Godzilla series or monster movies in general, you should definitely give GAMERA a try.

Here is the official release on the DVD:

GAMERA, THE GIANT MONSTERSPECIAL EDITION

featuring north american dvd debut of

 the original japanese version of the first gamera movie

presented in anamorphic widescreen from a newly restored hd master

 

ROARS ONTO DVD ON MAY 18, 2010

 

From Japan – the country that brought us such mythical movie monsters as Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra and King Ghidorah – storms Gamera, the titanic terrapin feared by adults and loved by children. On May 18, 2010, Shout! Factory will unleash Gamera, The Giant Monster – Special Edition on DVD for the first time in its unedited original version, with English subtitles — in anamorphic widescreen from an all-new HD master. The DVD includes a 12-page booklet with an essay by director Noriaki Yuasa, a photo gallery, trailers and more. The collectible Gamera, The Giant Monster Special Edition DVD is priced to own at $19.93.

Created by the same company who brought Zatoichi to the screen, Daiei Studios’ titanic terrapin is the only true rival to Toho’s King Of The Monsters, able to hold his own at the box office and secure a place in the hearts of kaiju eiga (Japanese monster movie) fans around the world. The original films have woefully been underrepresented on DVD, a especially release featuring the authentic Japanese versions.


 


 

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